Google's Visual Identity Toolkit

This article on the 'It's Nice That' blog, showcases the recent launch toolkit used to promote Google's new visual language.

The new language, titled Material Design will be used in all of Google’s platforms and devices to provide a consistent, unified experience

For its launch at the 2014 Google I/O Conference, they wanted a physical way of communicating this new language. San Francisco based design agency Manual produce this limited-edition give-away for the event.

Source: http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/manual...

A Brand that Connects on a Global Scale

What if you could high five someone in Amsterdam, standing in New York? KLM installed an interactive system which connected hundreds of people in Amsterdam and New York through a 'live high five'. For one day only, citizens could win a return flight to Amsterdam and New York just by high-fiving at the exact same time. By connecting hundreds of people face to face across the ocean, KLM gained invaluable coverage for the price of a few economy tickets.

Taken from Digital Buzz Blog.

Source: http://www.digitalbuzzblog.com/klm-live-hi...

Branding - Balancing Global with Local

Working with (and often creating) global brands that have local applications is something we're regularly tasked with at Proctors. So how do you find a sensible, effective blend of the two?

This blog article, written by Tim Hughes on behalf of US agency Bulldog Drummond, explains how brands big and small should consider the combination of central control and local management to achieve the best results.

Source: http://bulldogdrummond.com/#/panel-home5

From Louboutin to Baked Beans: When Brands Trademark Colors

  You may remember that last year Cadbury was blocked by rival Nestlé in its attempt to trademark the distinctive purple it had been using for its chocolates for more than 100 years (now defined as Pantone 2685C). Now it's Woolworth's turn to be the spoiler, via its objections that have led to the rejection of oil giant BP's twelve-year attempt to trademark the use of Pantone 348C, the green it employs for much of its branding. In this case the decision was made by the Australian intellectual property authorities, in contrast to BP's earlier victories in England and Europe. This made us wonder how many firms have been successful in trademarking the use of color in their branding. We've rounded up some examples below — just point us to any notable examples we've missed and we'll add them.

 

You may remember that last year Cadbury was blocked by rival Nestlé in its attempt to trademark the distinctive purple it had been using for its chocolates for more than 100 years (now defined as Pantone 2685C). Now it's Woolworth's turn to be the spoiler, via its objections that have led to the rejection of oil giant BP's twelve-year attempt to trademark the use of Pantone 348C, the green it employs for much of its branding. In this case the decision was made by the Australian intellectual property authorities, in contrast to BP's earlier victories in England and Europe.

This made us wonder how many firms have been successful in trademarking the use of color in their branding. We've rounded up some examples below — just point us to any notable examples we've missed and we'll add them.

The distinctive red soles of Louboutin shoes are trademarked

The distinctive red soles of Louboutin shoes are trademarked

Cadbury

Cadbury

The red wax tip of fruit from Pacific Coast Eco Bananas is trademarked

The red wax tip of fruit from Pacific Coast Eco Bananas is trademarked

Veuve Clicquot Champagne (Pantone 137C)  

Veuve Clicquot Champagne (Pantone 137C)

 

The Tiffany Blue box

The Tiffany Blue box