Tablet Vs Smartphone Browsing Statistics

According to a report by IBM, looking at browsing and shopping habits earlier this year, smartphones were used more than tablets to access the web.

Source: IBM Holiday Benchmark 2015

Source: IBM Holiday Benchmark 2015

This is borne out by our own site visit analytics for a client in the education sector in Saudi Arabia. Here you can see that, whilst the visits from smartphones have grown steadily, those from tablets have actually fallen slightly.

Source: Proctors analysis for Saudi education client

Source: Proctors analysis for Saudi education client

It should also be noted however, that tablet visitors were more likely to convert to taking action. The IBM study observed that 12.4 percent of all online sales came from tablet browsers, vs 10.7 percent came from smartphone browsers.

Europe trailing NA and APAC in mobile marketing, privacy to blame

This fascinating article from Marketing Week breaks down a number of key statistics from a recent study by location-based technology company xAd.

The study reveals that the European mobile advertising market is struggling to keep up with the North American and Asian Pacific markets, with privacy concerns seen as the primary stumbling block.  

"Western Europe is behind in mobile ad spend compared to other global regions owing to concerns about privacy, consumer engagement and a lack of standardised metrics"

 

Mobile Apps: Native, Web or Hybrid?

The methods we use to connect with mobile audiences are getting more complex as technologies develop and converge. We've had a look at the pros and cons of the three main options.

Image courtesy of Jürg Stuker

Image courtesy of Jürg Stuker

What are the options?

  • A full native app

  • A full web app

  • A hybrid

What's the difference?

Native apps are built on software that uses a mobile device's operating system. They're downloaded from an app store and installed on to a device.

Web apps are HTML web pages that look and behave like an app in mobile web browsers. There's no software to install, they’re just found by browsing the web from a mobile device.

Hybrid apps also use HTML web pages but through their own built-in browsers. Like native apps, they’re downloaded from an app store and once installed, behave in the same way.

What are the pros and cons?

Native app pros

  • Can use the built-in features of a device's hardware – contacts, camera, GPS, accelerometer, compass etc.
  • Richer functionality (most of which can be used offline) and better performance than web apps
  • Easy for users. They can search for your app, see user reviews and download it from the app store. They can then access it straight from their device's desktop without having to go online.
  • Notifies users when you make updates

Native app cons

  • You’ll need to develop the app several times to cover different phone operating systems (iOS, Android, Windows)
  • A native app needs different coding skills from other web development, so you’ll be adding to your digital marketing cost base and development time

Web app pros

  • Easier to maintain, with just one code base for all mobile platforms
  • Quicker to develop
  • There’s no risk of it breaking when operating systems get updated
  • You don't need to submit it to an app store for approval, so can release it whenever you like
  • Users don't need an app store account to access your app, or to update it when you make changes

Web app cons

  • Users have to be connected to the internet to access web apps
  • Functionality could be limited by the type of browser in the user's device, so limited access to their GPS, camera etc. (This is a moving feast though, as new APIs and modules are developed every day)
  • Not all of the mobile system features are available to web apps. The ability to send users update alerts, for example, is patchy right now, but this should be standardised  next year
  • Performance of more complex functionality won’t be as good as with a native app
  • Supporting multiple browsers can prove expensive
  • It might be harder for users to find your app, as it won’t be listed in any app stores.  And explaining that 'it's an app, but through the web' can be tricky.

Hybrid app pros

  • Behaves the way users expect an app to - they can find and download it from the app store, it sits on their mobile device and they don't always need to be online to use it
  • Most functionality can be delivered using HTML web technology, so it’s quicker and more cost effective for you to develop
  • Software packages mean a web development team can develop hybrid apps in web HTML, then wrap them into the system platform shell, so there’s no need for two development teams and standards.
  • Can give users native app functionality (GPS, camera, alerts etc.) through their devices’ hardware and software

Hybrid cons

  • More development time/cost than a mobile app (but not as much as a full native app)
  • Launch and promotion are reliant on the app store's approval (which is sometimes affected by subjective rulings) and can add to your timeline.

iOS vs. Android - is that the Real Debate?

When running a marketing campaign there are huge amounts of issues and concerns that a marketer needs to consider.  Not just the development of an appropriate marketing mix, but how a campaign is targeted in an era where individuals have an average of 2.3 devices. 

In order to target effectively, a marketing manager needs to know how their audience likes to get their daily fix of media across which devices

Ad targeting company, Drawbridge, analysed data from one billion consumers to paint a picture of the new media landscape:

·      Women prefer iOS devices

·      iPhone users who also have tablets tend to have iPads

·      Android phone users are less loyal with only 44% using Android tablets (compared to 78% above)

·      Android tablets are more popular in Germany than any other country in Europe

There are some more stats that you can read here.  However, the key point to take away from any report is that the days of traditional ad buying are dwindling.  To run an effective campaign a brand needs to target individuals, regardless of the device they’re using.  Then a manager can focus on the tracking, focus on the measurement and focus on the results to manoeuvre a campaign in real time. 

How Important is Mobile? Read this and You’ll Know the Answer!

A US study in eMarketer shows just how important mobile communication is for reaching an entire generation.  The most revealing fact is that 87% of US millennial smartphone users have their phones by their side 24/7.

Mobile is the primary access point for the internet by Millennials. Image courtesy of Peter Bartlett.

Mobile is the primary access point for the internet by Millennials. Image courtesy of Peter Bartlett.

Here are the key findings:

·      86% agreed that there are still a lot of websites that don’t offer good mobile functionality

·      47% attempt to access the mobile site of a business at least once a day

·      60% believe everything will be done on mobile devices in the next five years

·      64% of users aged 18 – 34 use their mobile as their primary device for internet access

But there’s plenty more and a really interesting article, read it all here.

Source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Smartphon...

Why Should I Get a Responsive Site?

Are you looking for reasons why you should make your website responsive for mobile and tablet browsers? Here's a great infographic from HubSpot which gives some pretty compelling stats to base the decision on, depending on your audience. Did you know, for instance, that 25% of internet users only view the internet through their phone, or that smartphone users check their devices 150 times a day on average?

You might also be interested in reading our article on B2B mobile browsing habits.

How Teens Deal With Privacy When Using Mobile Apps.

A Pew Internet and American Life survey shows how teens 12 to 17 years old think about privacy when using mobile apps. While some are nonchalant about the kind of personal information some apps collect, more than half avoid some apps due to privacy concerns. Girls who responded to the survey were more aware than boys of the risks associated with location tracking services in many mobile apps — 59 percent responded that they turn off location services, while only 37 percent of boys reported turning off the service.

A Pew Internet and American Life survey shows how teens 12 to 17 years old think about privacy when using mobile apps. While some are nonchalant about the kind of personal information some apps collect, more than half avoid some apps due to privacy concerns.

Girls who responded to the survey were more aware than boys of the risks associated with location tracking services in many mobile apps — 59 percent responded that they turn off location services, while only 37 percent of boys reported turning off the service.

Source: http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/08/ho...